The Wall of Faces

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CLAYBORN WILLIS ASHBY JR


is honored on Panel 39E, Line 69 of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial.

Leave a Remembrance

REMEMBRANCES

  • I'm proud of our Vietnam Veterans

    Posted on 11/16/17 - by Dennis Wriston
    Petty Officer Second Class Clayborn Willis Ashby Jr., Served with Observation Squadron 67 (VO-67), Pacific Fleet.
  • Remembered

    Posted on 10/4/16 - by Lucy Conte Micik bennysgift@gmail.com
    DEAR PETTY OFFICER ASHBY,
    THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE AS A NAVY AVIATION ORDNANCEMAN. I AM GLAD YOU WERE FOUND. WELCOME HOME, REST IN PEACE.
    MORE
  • Respectfully

    Posted on 6/28/15 - by Lisa.mollenkopf@gmail.com
    my father,who fought in WWII, bought my family pow bracelets in the 70's. All of our men were found except his. He wore his bracelet until he died last year. I now have the bracelet and am pleased to see this page available for clayborn. Thank you for your service.
    MORE
  • Final Mission of AO2 Clayborn W. Ashby Jr.

    Posted on 11/23/14 - by wkillian@smjuhsd.org
    On February 17, 1968, an OP-2E from Observation Squadron 67 departed Thailand in a flight of four aircraft on an operational mission over Laos. The crew of the aircraft included CDR Glenn M. Hayden, LTJG James S. Kravitz, LT Curtis F. Thurman, ENS James C. Wonn, AO2 Clayborn W. Ashby Jr., ADJ2 Chester L. Coons, AN Frank A. Dawson, ATN1 Paul N. Donato, and AN James E. Martin. After completion of the first target run, the aircraft reported to its fighter escort and forward air control aircraft that it had been hit by small arms fire but would continue with the second target run. During the second run, the fighter escort reported the starboard engine of the OP-2 on fire. The OP-2 acknowledged the report and aborted the rest of their mission to return to home base. The last radio transmission from the aircraft was, "we're beat up pretty bad." The fighter escort climbed to the top of the overcast to await the OP-2 rendezvous, but the aircraft never emerged from the cloud base. The fighter dropped below the clouds to search for the OP-2 and found burning wreckage. No parachutes were seen, nor were any emergency radio beepers heard. Search and rescue efforts were negative. Investigation of the crash site was not feasible because of enemy presence in the area. The aircraft crashed about 34 kilometers northwest of Xepone in Savannakhet Province, Laos. The crash site was situated 2,800 meters south of route 91 in rugged terrain on the side of a 550 meter ridge, approximately 4 kilometers northwest of Muang Phin. The aircraft was on a reconnaissance mission and carried no ordnance. Because there was no direct witness to the crash of the OP2, it is not known whether any of the crew of nine survived, but assumed that they did not. All nine aboard were classified Killed, Body Not Recovered. Although this aircraft went down in a relatively populous area, it is not known whether the enemy knows the fates of the crewmembers. In 1993 remains identified as crewmen of this aircraft were returned to the United States. [Taken from pownetwork.org]
    MORE
  • To the uncle I never met

    Posted on 10/19/14
    Clayborn the uncle I never met. I only get to hear stories about you. I know you were a great brother and son. I wish things would of turned out different. I want to thank you for giving your life for us. Love ya!
    MORE
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The Wall of Faces

Brought to you by the organization that built The Wall, the Vietnam Veterans Virtual Memorial Wall is dedicated to honoring, remembering and sharing the legacies of all those who died in the Vietnam War. Here you can go beyond the names on The Wall to see the faces, share the stories and read the remembrances posted by friends, neighbors, classmates and family members.

All of these photos will be showcased in The Education Center at The Wall on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. To learn more about the effort to collect these photos and ensure their faces will never be forgotten, visit www.buildthecenter.org.