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GLENN CHRISTIE DUNCAN


is honored on Panel 11W, Line 91 of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial.

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GLENN CHRISTIE
DUNCAN
SUBMIT PHOTOS
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REMEMBRANCES

  • WE Remember

    Posted on 11/21/15 - by Robert Sage 1968rsage@gmail.com
    Glenn is buried at Georgia Memorial Park, Marietta, Cobb County, GA. Sect B, Garden of Life
  • Remembering An American Hero

    Posted on 5/6/14 - by Curt Carter ccarter02@earthlink.net
    Dear SSGT Glenn Christie Duncan, sir

    As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

    May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

    With respect, Sir

    Curt Carter
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  • We Are Stardust

    Posted on 9/11/08 - by Rick Hendricks hurlrock@gmail.com
    I have told the story to many over the years of my remembrance of Glenn Duncan from Pace Academy. Glenn was older and one of the "Cool Kids" and an excellent athlete to whom we all looked up, but did not really know. I was 14-15 in 1968 and our age group was competing at the high jump inside the William T. Boyd Gymnasium. I had reached the limit that my skills & straddle technique could achieve and was frustrated that I could go no further. After watching me knock down the aluminum bar time after time, with the associated resounding clatter, Glenn suddenly appeared beside me and asked quietly if he could "show me something special". I was delightfully shocked as it never occurred to me that Glenn even knew who I was. He proceeded to show me "a most excellent way of jumping". He ran to the pit, planted, and then gracefully arched up backwards over the bar, flipping his feet clear at the last instant. I was astounded! He did this a few times in demonstration, making it look effortless. We had a trampoline at home, and so going forward or backwards was no big deal in concept, and I found that I was quickly able to mimic his technique, jumping higher than I ever had before. He took the time to congratulate my efforts and told me to "keep up the good work" in a perfect big-brotherly way. I was elated at my improvement and thrilled that someone with the prestige of Glenn would take the time to give me advice, which probably explains why that incident is carved into my memory. The funny thing is that I also retained the odd detail that as Glenn was repeatedly soaring over the bar, his tennis shoes didn't match. I did not know what to make of one being light and one being dark, and just "let it go".

    My recollection of the exact sequence of events in that year is unclear, but I became aware that Glenn had been teaching me what became known as "The Fosbury Flop", employed by Dick Fosbury to win the Gold at the 1968 Mexico City Olympic Games. It seemed to me that I recalled this happening before the Summer Games when I was still 14, earlier in 1968. I suppose Glenn may have seen Fosbury using this technique to win the NCAA title or at the Olympic trials, though I cannot be certain that it wasn't until after the Olympics, and of course it really doesn't matter. Glenn won his own Gold Medal in my estimation that day, and while we were all heartbroken later at Pace upon hearing of his ultimate sacrifice for his country, I was especially saddened. Glenn has continued to influence me with his act of kindness, to remember to always reach back, to pull up those behind and below whenever possible. It is my personal tribute to Glenn, and easy work indeed.

    I have a personal love for astronomy and exploration, and have taken part in the "Stardust at Home" mission to examine for stardust, the individual photos of the aerogel returned to earth by the NASA Stardust mission to Comet Wild 2. Imagine my delight in seeing the name "Glenn Christie Duncan" honored by being included on that space flight!

    The 2008 Summer Olympics were recently held, and of course always remind me of Glenn because of the Dick Fosbury connection. I was astounded to see a VISA commercial which featured the exploits of Dick Fosbury! It depicted him as the non-conformist whom achieved greatness, and during the voice-over, showed superb slow-motion of Fosbury clearing the bar. I smiled in satisfaction, and in quiet tribute to Glenn, when I realized that he was wearing one white shoe and one dark!

    Today on September 11th, 2008, I wanted to honor in my own way the memory of Glen Christie Duncan along with his cousin Phil, and the many others whom have served & sacrificed so that we can enjoy and promote the blessings of Freedom.

    "Well done good and faithful servants!"

    Most sincerely,

    Rick Hendricks
    Roswell, GA
    hurlrock@gmail.com
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  • Remembering Glenn - An Introduction

    Posted on 6/15/04 - by Alan Duncan al_duncan_sra@yahoo.com
    Glenn was the oldest boy in a family of 3 boys and 2 girls. Contrary to what is displayed, Glenn was born in Baldwyn, Mississippi to Paul Wesley Duncan and Evelyn Mary (Christie) Duncan. He later lived in Quantico, VA; Atlanta, GA; and Smyrna, GA. Glenn attended Campbell High School and Pace Academy, as well as Georgia Southern and Kennesaw Colleges. Glenn married Jenny Corkill and changed his student status to part-time. Before long he received his draft notice. He excelled in basic training and was recommended for NCO School. While in California attending school before deploying to Vietnam, Glenn was asked to serve as the military escort for his cousin, Phil Duncan, who was killed in an explosion in Vietnam in February of 1970. Glenn and Phil were the closest in age of all of the cousins, being born 5 days apart (Glenn was the oldest). He accompanied the casket from California to Baldwyn, Mississippi for burial. Phil's death was devastating to the family, but this was only the beginning, for Glenn was struck down 3 months later, after having been in Vietnam for only a short time. Glenn was killed before his wife, Jenny, could inform him that she was pregnant with their first and only child. On December 2, 1970, a beautiful baby boy was born, Marc Wesley Duncan. He is grown now, and is always being told by the family, how much he looks like his dad. I wish he could have known his dad as I had known him. Glenn would have been a wonderful father, for he was an exceptional and caring brother. We always called each other by family nicknames, he was Butch and I was Bud. I was only 11 when he went away to the war, and I was so devastated when informed of his death. I still miss him today, and wish he were here to be my big brother.

    In 1999, I rode in the annual Rolling Thunder parade on Memorial Day to pay homage to a brave and loving man. I wish Glenn could have been with me in body instead of just spirit, but alas he gave the ultimate sacrifice for his family and country. Farewell Butch, always know you are loved on this earth and are still deeply missed. Look after our sister, Honey (Beverly), who so recently joined you. All my love, your baby brother, Bud (Alan)
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  • You’ll Always Be Remembered

    Posted on 4/30/03 - by Kaitlyn Paxton
    Recognizing some Vietnam War Veterans was an assignment given to me by my U.S History teacher. I thought this would be a really neat assignment that will make an impact to many people.

    I wanted to take a moment and remember Glenn Christie Duncan. This fallen soldier gave his life fighting for what he believed in. His selflessness and bravery can only be admired and respected. You will always be remembered!
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The Wall of Faces

Brought to you by the organization that built The Wall, the Vietnam Veterans Virtual Memorial Wall is dedicated to honoring, remembering and sharing the legacies of all those who died in the Vietnam War. Here you can go beyond the names on The Wall to see the faces, share the stories and read the remembrances posted by friends, neighbors, classmates and family members.

All of these photos will be showcased in The Education Center at The Wall on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. To learn more about the effort to collect these photos and ensure their faces will never be forgotten, visit www.buildthecenter.org.