The Wall of Faces

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JOHN KEITH ANDERSON


is honored on Panel 20W, Line 120 of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial.

Leave a Remembrance

REMEMBRANCES

  • My adorable, funny, still missed, baby brother, John Keith Anderson

    Posted on 9/6/16 - by Peggy Anderson Aneiros Aneirosm@gmail.com
    John was my youngest brother. He went to the Defense Language Institute to learns Vietnamese and became an interpreter. He wrote home often; separate letters to our parents and his siblings. He never gave any info that had to be redacted but kept his letters enjoyable. He did tell us once that he had lost a front tooth on one of his many helicopter jumps doing his job, when he forgot to duck. He also told us he and others had rescued a mother dog and her pups and he listed all their names but one which he gracefully said, for Mom's sake, was named after her mother... Wish I could go on and on :)
    One sad letter explained that he had planned to send a surprise home before he would be home and was sure we would all love the surprise. But it turned out the surprise was a Vietnamese girl he wanted to send home for her safety, until he came across a paper she had listing Americans who were wanted by the North and John's name was on it. We could only imagine his sadness when he had to turn her in. He still signed up,for a second tour but didn't live to complete it.
    If anyone remembers John or any other interpreters read this I would love to hear from them. I've asked on many sites but never have found any other interpreters.
    MORE
  • Remembered

    Posted on 9/5/16 - by Lucy Conte Micik bennysgift@gmail.com
    DEAR SPECIALIST 5TH CLASS ANDERSON,
    THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE AS A VOICE INTERCEPTOR. TODAY IS LABOR DAY - WHAT BETTER DAY TO THANK THOSE OF YOU WHO MADE CELEBRATING POSSIBLE - REST IN PEACE.
    MORE
  • My brother

    Posted on 6/8/15 - by Peggy Anderson Aneiros aneirosm@gmail.com
    John was the baby of our family, the only member to enlist in the service. He and his best friend enlisted together, out of boredom, as he said later. It was more than either of them bargained for. Tom Raubolt was killed in action in 1968. John became an interpreter but died in a truck crash in 1969. His many letters home were testimony to all that has been said about the 'police action'. He had a great sense of humor - writing to our folks that his group had adopted a female dog and her pups and his was named, well, after its mother.....
    He is missed always and I'm constantly reminded that he will always be a kid, never aging, always our John.
    MORE
  • Remembering An American Hero

    Posted on 11/14/13 - by Curt Carter ccarter02@earthlink.net
    Dear SP5 John Keith Anderson, sir

    As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

    May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

    With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir

    Curt Carter
    MORE
  • Childhood friend

    Posted on 7/15/11 - by Janet L.
    I remember a good time at your house: folks and sibs visiting, good food. You, me and a red-head girl cousin-friend were playing your piano,& we were singing 'Autumn Leaves'. I can still hear it in my head. I thought we were pretty good, too! Miss you
    MORE
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The Wall of Faces

Brought to you by the organization that built The Wall, the Vietnam Veterans Virtual Memorial Wall is dedicated to honoring, remembering and sharing the legacies of all those who died in the Vietnam War. Here you can go beyond the names on The Wall to see the faces, share the stories and read the remembrances posted by friends, neighbors, classmates and family members.

All of these photos will be showcased in The Education Center at The Wall on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. To learn more about the effort to collect these photos and ensure their faces will never be forgotten, visit www.buildthecenter.org.