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JOHN TIMOTHY CONRY


is honored on Panel 1W, Line 15 of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial.

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REMEMBRANCES

  • Hi Tim

    Posted on 5/14/18 - by Michael Peddecord michael.peddecord@gmail.com
    Here we are 2018 almost Memorial Dan and I am 70. My friend and are who was a medic, are thinking about our friends who were KIA in Nam. God bless you Tim you were a better man than I.
    MORE
  • THANK YOU

    Posted on 1/12/18 - by Lucy Micik bennysgift@gmail.com
    Dear Lt John Conry,
    Thank you for your service as a Rotary Wing Aviation Unit Commander (Pilot.) Your 72nd birthday just passed. Happy Birthday. It is 2018, Happy New Year. It is so important for us all to acknowledge the sacrifices of those like you who answered our nation's call. Please watch over America, it stills needs your strength, courage and faithfulness. Rest in peace with the angels.
    MORE
  • IN REMEMBRANCE OF THIS FINE YOUNG UNITED STATES ARMY AVIATOR WHOSE NAME SHALL LIVE FOREVER MORE

    Posted on 2/1/17 - by CLAY MARSTON CLAYMARSTON@HOTMAIL.COM


    IN REMEMBRANCE OF THIS FINE YOUNG
    UNITED STATES ARMY AVIATOR
    WHOSE NAME SHALL LIVE FOREVER MORE


    1st LIEUTENANT

    JOHN TIMOTHY CONRY


    served with the


    361st AVIATION COMPANY ( ESCORT )

    " PINK PANTHERS "

    17th AVIATION GROUP ( COMBAT )

    " FREEDOM'S EAGLES "

    1st AVIATION BRIGADE

    " ABOVE THE REST "


    and was a

    posthumous recipient

    of the following

    military decorations

    and service medals


    AIR MEDAL

    PURPLE HEART

    NATIONAL DEFENSE SERVICE MEDAL

    VIETNAM SERVICE MEDAL

    REPUBLIC OF VIETNAM CAMPAIGN SERVICE MEDAL


    and was entitled to wear


    ARMY AVIATOR WINGS



    TODAY HE RESTS

    IN HONORED GLORY IN


    SAINT FRANCIS CEMETERY

    PHOENIX, ARIZONA

    MAUSOLEUM

    CORRIDOR 207 / TIER 0 / SPACE 8161




    YOU ARE NOT FORGOTTEN

    NOR SHALL YOU EVER BE




    R E M E M B R A N C E




    MORE INFORMATION MAY BE FOUND ON -

    http://pownetwork.org/bios/r/r090.htm


    === === === === === === === === === ===


    THE RESCUE OF

    LT. JOHN T. " TIM " CONRY

    by JIM STEIN - THE BATTLE OF KONTUM -

    On 9 May 1972 after just completing our first recon mission Northwest of Kontum and refueling our LOH-6 at Kontum, I noticed a Cobra gunship from the 361st AWC " The Pink Panthers ", landing, but they were having problems. I thought that the front seat was new, someone was wounded or they had mechanical problems from maintenance or gunfire.

    After refueling we departed for our second mission.

    Once we got to altitude I listened to the operation where the Cobra from the 361st AWC had been shot up and they were trying to rescue pilots from a downed Cobra. I called and offered our services and was told to keep off the air.

    Just before dusk we were released to return to Camp Holloway. Taking off from Kontum I received a radio transmission from command and control running the rescue operation, asking if we would try rescuing a pilot on the ground out of Ben Het. They mentioned they were still receiving mirror flashes but not sure if it was the pilot or the enemy. By now the enemy had moved closer to the downed Cobra gunship. I called my wing man asking him to stay on station and wait to see if I would need him to rescue us, myself and the observer.

    We received our briefing in the air; Ben Het was about 45 kilometers from Kontum, they had tried unsuccessfully with a Huey, each time getting shot out of the area. I agreed; LOH drivers never wanted to leave anyone behind.

    I believe I asked for my guns " The Undertakers " to fly lead with the Pink Panthers in a daisy chain. By this time it was dark and we were going in for the rescue blacked out except for a light on top, so the guns could keep track of us. I called Undertaker 13 telling him I was descending from altitude and would be reaching the ground about a half mile out, flying Lima Lima ( low leveled ) in to the area of the downed Cobra. I asked Undertaker 13 if he still had me in sight and that was the only time he was allowed to talk on an operational channel. He confirmed sighting me.

    Once we arrived in the area we located the Cobra but we were unable to locate the pilot. We must have hovered around for a few minutes taking some small arms fire. I radioed gun lead and told them we were going to turn the landing lights on to help locate the pilot and asked them to give us close air support. We knew that the area would erupt with gunfire when the enemy could finally see the LOH. Lights went on and the tracers started to zip by. I imagine the guns were returning fire only to the flashes; we still hadn't located the pilot. My observer sighted Tim Conry on his knees. I moved the LOH over and landed right next to him and told the guns my aircraft was the safe area and blow everything else up and put the rockets as close as they could. I know some of the holes were from the guns close air support. God, you had to love those gun pilots.

    I told the observer to get out and to help Tim into the aircraft. The observer got back in and I radioed 13 we had the Pilot and were taking off in the same direction we came in. 13, just said, " We have you ".

    About 30 seconds into the flight my observer noticed Tim was partly hanging out of the ship, we were still low level so I landed the LOH and asked the observer to get back and stay with Tim and to hook up to the rear ( ear ) plugs so we could communicate. I asked him to find out how bad Tim's injuries were and if he thought Tim could make it to the 67 Evac an American Medical Hospital at Pleiku or did we need to go to Kontum. The observer answered Pleiku.

    While climbing up to 1500 feet and heading towards Pleiku, it was real quiet and I thought to my self, under those conditions, we didn't have a chance of completing that extraction and chills ran down my back. I started making radio calls but had no response. I looked at the aircraft radios and discovered why it was so quiet; somehow they were all turned off. I finally made communication, letting everyone know our plans and thanking the guns for their excellent coverage.

    My twenty-minute fuel warning light came on about 15 minutes from Pleiku. I radioed the 67 Evac and they were ready when we landed. I got out of the aircraft and followed the group inside, I wanted to find out Tim's condition so I could inform members of the 361st.

    The doctor looked at me and said " I'm sorry Captain but this man is dead", I stated " he can't be dead ". The doctor said " he's very cold and has been dead for hours ". I answered " We just spoke with him twenty minutes ago ". A chill ran up my back and as I walked out the door I took my fist and left a hole in their wall. I was pissed.

    I got in the LOH, flying on fumes about 1 click to POL, refueled and started searching for my feelings. We just rescued a dead man in an area I didn't think we would make it out of and he was on his knees and spoke to us when we picked him up. After refueling and parking the aircraft in the revetment I walked to my unit. I was stopped by some of the members of 361st. They thanked me; I remember I had tears forming in my eyes when I told them he didn't make it. I mentioned when they write to let his family know, Tim knew he had been rescued.


    THE BATTLE OF KONTUM

    http://www.thebattleofkontum.com/memories/memories.html

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BattleofKontum


    20 JUNE 1999

    ======

    MORE
  • We Remember

    Posted on 7/7/15 - by Robert Sage 1968rsage@gmail.com
    John (Tim) is buried along with 2 of his brothers at Saint Francis Cemetery, Phoenix, AZ. Plot Mausoleum, Corridor 207, Tier 0, Space 8161
  • My good friend and classmate.

    Posted on 12/19/14 - by Richard Moyer CCMSGT (ret) rmoyer@outlook.com
    What a great person Tim. Started 1st grade together and I lost track of him in high school. Tim was obviously destined to do great things. He was a good athlete and smart in school. I did not learn about his passing in Vietnam for several years later. RIP TIM.
    MORE
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The Wall of Faces

Brought to you by the organization that built The Wall, the Vietnam Veterans Virtual Memorial Wall is dedicated to honoring, remembering and sharing the legacies of all those who died in the Vietnam War. Here you can go beyond the names on The Wall to see the faces, share the stories and read the remembrances posted by friends, neighbors, classmates and family members.

All of these photos will be showcased in The Education Center at The Wall on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. To learn more about the effort to collect these photos and ensure their faces will never be forgotten, visit www.buildthecenter.org.